NEXIUM

Generic Name/API: esomeprazole magnesium

Manufacturer: AstraZeneca

Dosage Forms & Strength & Pack Size:
Tablet, 20 mg, 40 mg, 28’s

Storage:
Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15° to 30°C (59° to 86°F). [See USP
Controlled Room Temperature]. Keep NEXIUM delayed-release capsules container tightly
closed. Dispense in a tight container if the NEXIUM delayed-release capsules product
package is subdivided.

  • INDICATION
  • IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

What is Nexium?
Nexium is a proton pump inhibitor that decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Nexium is used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions involving excessive stomach acid such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. It is also used to promote healing of erosive esophagitis (damage to your esophagus caused by stomach acid).
Nexium may also be given to prevent gastric ulcer caused by infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), or by the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Nexium is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Warnings
Nexium can cause kidney problems. Tell your doctor if you are urinating less than usual, or if you have blood in your urine.

Diarrhea may be a sign of a new infection. Call your doctor if you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it.

Esomeprazole may cause new or worsening symptoms of lupus. Tell your doctor if you have joint pain and a skin rash on your cheeks or arms that worsens in sunlight.

You may be more likely to have a broken bone while taking this medicine long term or more than once per day.

Before taking this medicine
You should not use Nexium if you are allergic to esomeprazole or to similar medicines such as lansoprazole (Prevacid), omeprazole (Prilosec, Zegerid), pantoprazole (Protonix), or rabeprazole (AcipHex).

Heartburn can mimic early symptoms of a heart attack. Get emergency medical help if you have chest pain that spreads to your jaw or shoulder and you feel anxious or light-headed.

You should not use this medicine if you have had kidney problems.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

severe liver disease;

lupus;

osteoporosis or low bone mineral density (osteopenia); or

low levels of magnesium in your blood.

You may be more likely to have a broken bone in your hip, wrist, or spine while taking a proton pump inhibitor long-term or more than once per day. Talk with your doctor about ways to keep your bones healthy.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

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