BRAFTOVI_75MG

Generic Name/API: encorafenib

Manufacturer: Array BioPharma Inc.

Dosage Forms & Strength & Pack Size:
Capsules: 75 mg

Storage:
Store at 20°C to 25°C (68°F to 77°F); excursions permitted between 15°C and 30°C (59°F and 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Do not use if safety seal under cap is broken or missing. Dispense in original bottle. Do not remove desiccant. Protect from moisture. Keep container tightly closed.

  • INDICATION
  • IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
What is BRAFTOVI and MEKTOVI?

BRAFTOVI (encorafenib) is a prescription medicine used:

  • in combination with a prescription medicine called MEKTOVI (binimetinib) to treat adults with a type of skin cancer called melanoma:
    • that has spread to other parts of the body or cannot be removed by surgery, and
    • that has a certain type of abnormal “BRAF” gene
  • in combination with a medicine called cetuximab for the treatment of adults with cancer of their colon or rectum (colorectal cancer):
    • that has been previously treated, and
    • that has spread to other parts of the body, and
    • that has a certain type of abnormal “BRAF” gene
  • in combination with MEKTOVI to treat adults with a type of lung cancer called non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC):
    • that has spread to other parts of the body, and
    • that has a certain type of abnormal “BRAF” gene

BRAFTOVI should not be used to treat people with wild-type BRAF melanoma, wild-type BRAF colorectal cancer, or wild-type BRAF NSCLC. Your healthcare provider will perform a test to make sure that BRAFTOVI or BRAFTOVI with MEKTOVI is right for you.

It is not known if BRAFTOVI or MEKTOVI is safe and effective in children.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

BRAFTOVI (encorafenib) and MEKTOVI (binimetinib) may cause serious side effects, including:

  • Risk of new skin cancers. BRAFTOVI, when used alone or with MEKTOVI or cetuximab, may cause skin cancers called cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma or basal cell carcinoma. Talk to your healthcare provider about your risk for these cancers.

Check your skin and tell your healthcare provider right away about any skin changes, including a:

    • new wart
    • skin sore or reddish bump that bleeds or does not heal
    • change in size or color of a mole

Your healthcare provider should check your skin before treatment, every 2 months during treatment, and for up to 6 months after you stop treatment to look for any new skin cancers.

Your healthcare provider should also check for cancers that may not occur on the skin. Tell your healthcare provider about any new symptoms that develop during treatment.

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